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Notre Dame Fighting Irish 2020 NFL Draft Scouting Report

#22 Asmar Bilal (rSr.) MLB 6-2 227. Has appeared in 37 games with 10 starts. Versatile. Has experience at Rover, OLB and MLB. Has played a lot in space. Has good range when moving downhill or in a straight line. A good athlete. Has good mobility. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.55-4.65 40 range). Has excellent recovery speed. Can chase and make a play on the ball downfield (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 5:44 mark). Closes quickly on the ball in space as a run defender (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:11 mark and vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 13:25 mark). A solid form tackler. Always looks to wrap up the ball carrier/receiver.

Doesn’t take on and she’s blocks without retreating (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:02 mark). Has a bit of a delayed recognition and reaction in coverage at times (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:47 mark). Isn’t a fluid mover. Displays some hip stiffness when attempting to change direction (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 8:57 mark, vs. Michigan 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 12:27 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 5 at the 12:45 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:44 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:03 mark). Remains upright in his backpedal when dropping back in coverage (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:20 mark). Lacks good bend and flexibility off of the edge as a pass rusher (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:16 mark).

He’s a good athlete when he moves straight ahead. He closes really fast downhill and also when he’s in chase mode. He’s a speed player but lateral movement, backpedaling and flipping his hips are issues. His lack of lower body flexibility is striking and prevents him from truly being an in space pass defender. If invited to the Combine or at his Pro Day workout he will struggle in LB drills where he has to change direction at all. It isn’t a strength of his and it will be a key factor in him not being drafted potentially because he doesn’t have a position that he can hang his hat on. He isn’t a WLB, he isn’t a MLB because he can’t take on blocks without giving ground and can’t shed them and he isn’t a LB who can cover TE’s. If he’s to play MLB it’s a role he’s miscast in due to him not being an in the trenches type. He may get looks after the draft as a LB who plays in space. UDFA.

#20 Shaun Crawford (rSr.) CB 5-9 1/8 180. Has appeared in 15 games with 3 starts. Versatile. Has experience at both the field CB and in the slot. Good athlete. Has good speed and quickness. A natural athlete with good flexibility. Show little to no stiffness. A lot stronger than he appears. Can take on blocks without getting pushed back. Fearless as well. He’s never afraid to put his nose in there in run support and as a tackler at the LOS. Very good ball skills. Has excellent timing running stride for stride with the receiver and turning his head just as the pass is about to be received. Really evasive as a run defender. Slips would be blockers with ease when pursuing the ball carrier.

Has suffered three season ending injuries!!! Suffered a season ending torn right ACL in August of 2015. Was given a medical redshirt as a result. Suffered a ruptured left Achilles on September 10, 2016 against Nevada and missed the remainder of the season. Suffered a season ending torn left ACL in August of 2018. Still relatively inexperienced. Has a total of 498 defensive snaps for his career. Very small in stature. Has narrow shoulders and waist with small bone structure. Doesn’t have much growth potential. Size limits him to the slot only. Upright in his backpedal at times. Comes out of it off balance both laterally and forward. Tends to slip a lot. Doesn’t always show good eye discipline. Will watch the QB and WR in zone coverage but lose track while in motion. Will bite on a double move in the process. Misses too many open field tackles. Lacks top flight agility. Isn’t light on his feet at all times in coverage. Will get beat at the line in man coverage with a simple move because he’s firmly planted.

He’s a tough and resilient athlete. He’s bounced back and quickly from three very serious injuries in a way that most don’t recover from so fast. He will have to go thru a medical check at the Combine if he’s invited or at his Pro Day workout but with the way he moves it appears he’s suffered no long term affects from any of his injuries. He is a small player though so size and injury history will always be a concern. What he needs though is continued healthy play for however long he’s eligible and a good distance between the injuries and his draft date. There’s still a lot of work to be done as far as technique refinement as well. He has may have two years of eligibility left and it would be in his best interest to use them. He has really mature ball skills which not many possess so he does have upside to be a playmaker. Doesn’t declare.

#10 Chris Finke (rSr.) WR/PR 5-9 1/2 184. Has appeared in 36 games with 8 starts. Named a team captain in August of 2019. Former walk on who earn a scholarship on August 22, 2016. Versatile. Has experience in the X and Y positions. Has decent straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.55-4.60 40 range). Has really agility, flexibility and mobility. A natural and fluid mover. Displays good short area quickness (vs. USC 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:33 mark). Has good quickness off of the line. Has a really quick stutter step. Runs really crisp routes. Gives himself a good cushion against zone coverage when he flattens out his routes (vs. USC 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 11:17 mark and vs. USC 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 6:06 mark). Has good footwork as a route runner. Sells his routes very well (vs. USC 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:46 mark). Has soft hands as a pass catcher. Has excellent concentration as a pass catcher (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:17 mark and vs. USC 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 2:27 mark). Gives good effort as a blocker (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 4 at the 11:00 mark). Squares up with a wide base in space. A sure handed and very smart PR man.

Really small in stature. Has a thin build with little growth potential. Isn’t a top flight athlete. Doesn’t have great speed. Doesn’t have a second gear or top end speed. Tends to hop right before he stutter step into his routes (vs. Northwestern 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 7:25 mark). Isn’t elusive after the catch. Doesn’t get much yards after the catch.

He’s a very crafty player. He has a sustained and persistent type of speed. He can somehow outpace players who are faster than he is downfield. He’s the unsung type who does the little things you don’t see on the stat sheet that help his team. As a PR he sacrifices better numbers by falling on the sword so to speak. He will grab a punt inside his own 15 yard line instead of allowing it to roll closer to the goal line and letting the punt team touch it down closer to the goal line. His elusiveness is impressive as a returner in that he can make so many people miss in such a short area. He isn’t bigger, stronger or faster than any of his opponents but he still perseveres and produces despite his supposed shortcomings. If invited to the Combine he wouldn’t be a standout in the 40, he’d be a disappointment there but he’d do well in the agility drills. His Pro Day workout will be very important in that he could shave off a few tenths of a second to get him to the point where he’s got an outside chance at getting drafted. He may not get drafted but a team who knows the value of a slot receiver who does have some elusiveness and savvy as a route runner and who can safely field punts could have a player here. 7th-UDFA.

#12 Ian Book (rJr.) QB 6-0 1/8 212. Has appeared in 22 games with 11 starts. Named a team captain in August of 2019. A good athlete. A dual threat QB. Has really good mobility and escapability out of the pocket as a runner. Can pick up a good amount of yardage with his legs as a runner (vs. Pitt 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:45 mark and vs. USC 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 12 at the 5:14 mark). Always looks to slide to prevent a hit if he can. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.65-4.70 40 range). Sells the RPO very well at the goal line. Makes the defender lean in toward the RB so that he can run it outside (vs. Wake Forest 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & Goal at the 5:29 mark, vs. Wake Forest 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & Goal at the 11:33 mark and vs. Syracuse 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:48 mark). Has good mechanics as a passer. Has really quick and clean footwork when he drops back. Looks really centered from top to bottom. Has a very quick and consistent over hand throwing motion. Will change his arm angle and slot on his throws at times. Sets his feet on quick screen passes. Has a strong arm. Can make every throw in the book. Has good velocity to every level of the field. Goes thru his progressions really well for the most part. Sees the field really well in its entirety. A quick decision maker. Shows no delay in the processing arena. Gets the ball out of his hand quickly and hits his receivers on time (vs. Pitt 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:15 mark and vs. Syracuse 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 3:42 mark). Can throw his receivers open downfield (vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 11:57 mark). Has good accuracy to the flats, the short and intermediate levels. Displays good velocity on his passes in these ranges. Has good touch when needed to these levels as well. Throws the ball 40-55 yards downfield with little effort (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:07 mark and vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 7:29 mark). Shows some pinpoint accuracy to the intermediate to deep range at times (vs. USC 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 2:28 mark). Can loft a pass between the second and third levels of the defense (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:13 mark). Shows good accuracy on the back shoulder fade (vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 1:50 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 15:00 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2028, 4th quarter, 3rd & 2 at the 10:38 mark, vs. Syracuse 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:25 mark, vs. USC 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 6:59 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 6:41 mark). Has good accuracy when rolling out to his right (vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 1:14 mark, vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:50 mark and vs. Syracuse 2018, 3rd quarter, 4th & 1 at the 5:18 mark). Uses the pump fake very effectively (vs. wake Forest 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:05 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 6:54 mark). A very crafty play action passer. Will fake the handoff and appear to not have the ball before throwing a pass (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 4th & 2 at the 1:52 mark). Footwork is exceptional as a play action passer (vs. Syracuse 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:09 mark). Keeps his eye level up and downfield in the face of pressure. Buys time with his legs in the pocket to set up the pass (vs. Stanford 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the :47 mark). Can be elusive and evasive in the face of pressure (vs. Wake Forest 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 1 at the 7:03 mark and vs. USC 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 11 at the 4:58 mark). Has good escapability out of the pocket as a passer (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 10:10 mark, vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:51 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 5:08 mark and vs. Pitt 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 5 at the :33 mark). Has a sixth sense for pressure he sees and doesn’t see. Shows magician like ability when avoid a blitzing defender as a passer (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:52 mark, vs. Stanford 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:29 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:27 mark). Does a good job of improvising as a passer in the face of pressure (vs. Stanford 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 6 at the 3:17 mark and vs. Syracuse 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:49 mark).

Suffered bruised ribs and a kidney contusion on November 3, 2018 against Northwestern. Missed the following game on November 10, 2018 against Florida State as a result. Plays predominantly out of the shotgun. Does a lot of off balance passing. Doesn’t consistently step into his throws. Will at times stare down his first read. Won’t see a LB dropping back into a zone (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:58 mark). Or a DL (vs. Northwestern 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 1 at the 1:33 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 2 at the 9:08 mark). Doesn’t have great accuracy to the deep level. Will miss on some throws to the deep level (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the :27 mark and vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:16 mark). Has his moments where he’ll attempt to do too much and make something out of nothing (vs. Syracuse 2018, 2nd quarter, 4th & Goal at the 6:57 mark, vs. USC 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 12 at the 8:02 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 22 at the 3:17 mark). Isn’t an elusive open field runner when forced from the pocket or on designed runs.

He’s a really athletic player for the QB position. He has a blend of speed and quickness that makes him a threat as a running QB. He runs the RPO very well too and seems to know exactly what to do with the ball to gain an advantage on the defense. He has an advanced feel for the RPO. As a passer he has an excellent arm and can do anything asked of a QB as far as arm talent goes. When he uses touch as well as arm strength on his deep passes it’s a thing of beauty when he does connect with his receiver (vs. Pitt 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:49 mark). He’s a crisp and accurate passer who is really quick getting the ball to his receivers. He surprises them at times with how fast the ball is on them. He has a level of maturity as a play action passer and when avoiding pressure that not many possess. His stature although not a major issue any longer for the QB position may come into play. His listed height of 6-0 may fall a bit below to the 5-11 range when measured at the Combine. For an accurate passer he did show a different side in his last two performances of 2018/ He has to show that his inaccuracies in the last two games against USC and Clemson were uncharacteristic because those are the types of games that will be remembered and called into question when he’s evaluated. He has the makings of a definite franchise level QB and although two games doesn’t tell his full story how he plays in late December and possibly early January will go a long way in determining how high he goes. He should test very well in all aspects in a Combine type setting as well as in his Pro Day workout. He will be a draft riser as the process plays out. Mid 1st-late 2nd round.

#21 Jalen Elliott (Sr.) FS 6-0 1/2 210. Has appeared in 38 games with 26 starts. Named a team captain in August of 2019. Has excellent size for the position. Has an athletic frame with long arms. A good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.50-4.60 40 range). A very natural and fluid mover. Doesn’t have and hip stiffness. Has a smooth backpedal and springs forward out of it. Has good lateral agility. Changes direction smoothly and quickly (vs. Northwestern 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 6:34 mark). Has good range moving downhill from his deep S slot (vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 4:06 mark). Takes good angles to the ball coming downhill as a run defender (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:02 mark). A solid form tackler. A sure tackler. Can deliver a big hit on a receiver as well (vs. Michigan 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 12:27 mark). Takes on blocks really well as a run defender. Can disengage and/or evade blockers without giving up ground.

Isn’t very instinctive in coverage. Doesn’t read the QB quickly enough to get to his deep spots downfield to help his CB over the top. Will miss a few too many tackles because he doesn’t always break down in space (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:48 mark). Doesn’t consistently wrap up the ball carrier/receiver.

He’s a good athlete for the safety position. He’s fast, agile and rangy. He has the size profile and the type of athleticism that is coveted for a FS. He’s an assignment sound player. He’s taken very well to his coaching because he always seems to use proper technique and is almost always in good position. He was in good position with his two INT’s against Ball State (vs. Ball State 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 8:32 mark and vs. Ball State 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 12:42 mark) and his INT against Navy (vs. Navy 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:55 mark). He did show some ball hawk skill on his INT against Syracuse (vs. Syracuse 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:09 mark). There’s been a clear progression from year one to year two as a starter. He’s grown much more comfortable in his role as a defensive back. He has to take the steps forward to prove that he has ball hawking capabilities. That he can make plays on his own as a pass defender. He’s solid in run support as well as being a solid pass defender but he doesn’t display top flight capabilities in either way. It’s a matter of not if he can make plays but can he be a playmaker which will be a big factor in where he gets drafted. He will perform well at the Combine in speed and agility drills so his stock should be high after that but his playmaking capability once teams rewatch his film will be key. Late 2nd-early 4th round.

#74 Liam Eichenberg (rJr.) LT 6-6 1/8 305. Has appeared in 18 games with 13 starts. Has good size for the position. Has a solid build with good weight distribution throughout his frame. Has good arm length. Has a frame that could add 10-15 pounds of muscle mass without sacrificing any athleticism. A good athlete. Has impressive straight line explosiveness off of the snap. Gets out to the second level in a flash (vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:14 mark). A very effective cut blocker. Can take LB’s out completely (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:09 mark). Quick and coordinated off of the snap on pulls (vs. Florida State 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 2:27 mark). Gets good push as a run blocker. Keeps his legs churning and drives defenders off of the ball (vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & Goal at the 14:19 mark and vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:54 mark). A very strong down blocker (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:57 mark and vs. Stanford 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 11:16 mark).

Isn’t a dancing bear. Isn’t light on his feet. Doesn’t have quick feet out of his stance. Feet appear sluggish in his kick slide (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 15 at the 7:24 mark and vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:20 mark). Has bad technique from top to bottom as a pass blocker. Has bad footwork out of his at times (vs. Florida State 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 2 at the 3:04 mark). Tends to stop his feet on contact as a pass blocker (vs. Stanford 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the :54 mark). Lacks lateral agility and lateral quickness. Doesn’t shift his weight from his outside foot to his inside foot quickly (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 1:02 mark, vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 10:32 mark, vs. Stanford 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 9:01 mark, vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 9 at the 11:02 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 10:43 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 16 at the 10:46 mark, vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 6:41 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:27 mark). A waist bender. Will lunge at defenders. Displays poor hand placement at times (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 9 at the 9:12 mark and vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 7:59 mark).

He’s a good athlete with some very redeeming qualities for an OL. He has speed and quickness as well as power as a run blocker. He was a first year starter and it was a learning on the job training type of situation for him. The run blocking was where he thrived at times but his technique as a pass blocker was lacking for the entirety of the season. He had a particularly tough time as a first time starter against former Michigan DE/OLB and current New England Patriots 3rd round pick Chase Winovich, former Florida State DE/OLB and current Carolina Panthers 1st round pick Brian Burns and former Clemson DE/OLB and Oakland Raiders 1st round pick Clelin Ferrell. Struggling against these players is understandable but despite the toughness of the competition he has some issues with his pass blocking technique. He has a flaw in the angle of his jab step. He takes the first step in his kick slide but has to open up his hip further when speed rushers rush to his outside shoulder (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 4:05 mark). This also causes him to be off balance a lot. Poor balance almost always was a factor on every pass play (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 7:35 mark). His skill set may very well work out at LT but he has to somehow overcome his lack of lateral agility. He can clean up his technique but this may always be an issue. He may be better suited at RT and at OG where his run blocking skills can be put to better use and where he’s lack of agility isn’t exploited as much. He definitely has a great deal of upside but if he’s to remain at LT he will need to exhaust his eligibility to ensure he’s worked out his technical issue and that he’s fully prepared for a next level move. Doesn’t declare.

#11 Alohi Gilman (rJr.) SS 5-10 1/2 202. Has appeared in 27 games with 25 starts. Transferred from Navy to Notre Dame in June of 2017. Sat out the 2017 season due to NCAA transfer rules. Named a team captain in August of 2019. A good athlete. Has good agility, flexibility and mobility. A fluid mover. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.50-4.60 40 range). Has a strong and compact frame. Has good arm length. Extremely active. A really good tackler. Closes really fast downhill on the ball carrier (vs. Michigan 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:02 mark and vs. USC 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:54 mark). Takes good angles to the ball downhill and laterally (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 2 at the 11:34 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:25 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 1:15 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 3 at the 9:47 mark and vs. USC 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 13:06 mark). A solid run blitzer. Will flatten out and make the tackle on the ball carrier (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 2 at the 13:11 mark). Has good timing when defending against a pass (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 11:40 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 13 at the 5:03 mark). Shows good awareness in coverage and ball skills (vs. Syracuse 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 15:00 mark). A really good blitzer against the pass. Times his blitz well (vs. Florida State 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 9 at the 8:09 mark).

Missed all of spring practice of 2019 with an abdominal strain. Isn’t a quick twitch athlete. Can’t flip his hips out of his backpedal seamlessly against a speed receiver (vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 14 at the 1:51 mark). Isn’t suited to play man in NCB depth: Doesn’t always break down as a tackler. Will miss an open field tackle coming downhill at times (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the :32 mark).

He has very little wasted motion in all of his movements and everything he does seems to always be meaningful. He’s very smart and is almost always in the right place/where he should be. He has the ability to make plays in a very creative way (vs. Syracuse 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 12 at the 5:16 mark, vs. USC 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:11 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 9:19 mark). He’s a playmaker on the back end of the defense. He’s like a downhill homing device that zeros in on its target and gets to it in a hurry as a run defender. He has a keen sense and he’s uncanny with a very high success rate closing in on the ball (vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:15 mark). He rarely if ever showed any sort of weakness in his game aside from not being able to come up to the LOS and cover a receiver downfield like a CB. He’s a complete S, he can play both FS and SS but his skill set is excellent for SS where he can cut off and shut down the opponents running game. He’s that much of an impactful run defender. If he can show himself to be a rangy type of ball hawking S it will only aid in his rise up draft boards. He will most certain perform well at the Combine if he declares early and will propel himself into serious discussion as one of the top S targets come Draft day. Early 2nd-mid 3rd round.

#9 Daelin Hayes (Sr.) OLB/DE 6-3 3/4 266. Has appeared in 37 games with 13 starts. Versatile. Can line up all over the formation. Has experience at OLB, DE and lined up in space at NCB depth. A great athlete!!! Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.70 40 range). He has excellent agility, fluidity and mobility. He has extremely smooth and fluid movement ability. Has a cat like quickness. Has the look and demeanor of a cat who’s always looking to pounce. Has great cat like balance as well. Will get completely cut blocked, get right back up and be in position to pursue the ball. Covers a lot of real estate when dropping back into coverage. Gets to the short and intermediate flats in no time in a zone. Passes don’t get thrown in his direction much when he’s covering. Can penetrate the LOS with a subtle move as a run defender (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 11:05 mark and vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:59 mark). Has natural pass rush capabilities. Looks effortless in his spin move (vs. Michigan 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 8:05 mark and vs. Michigan 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:01 mark). It’s a very quick and effective move.

Has a history of shoulder injuries and surgeries. Suffered three shoulder injuries in high school (1 to his left shoulder and 2 to his right shoulder). He also lost a year of high school eligibility to a custody battle. Injuries and legal issues left him with only 10 games of high school experience in 3 seasons. Suffered a shoulder stinger against Stanford on September 29, 2018. Missed the following weeks game against Virginia Tech on October 6, 2018 as a result. Doesn’t disengage from blocks quickly. Gets stuck to blocks to often and for too long to make a play on the ball. Doesn’t use his hands well. Doesn’t extend his arms to lock out and keep blockers away from his frame. Doesn’t have a game plan as a pass rusher. Isn’t explosive off of the snap. Doesn’t use his pass rush moves. Seems to go to the bull rush as a pass rusher for the most part. Lacks flexibility around the OT. Doesn’t really attempt to go around or inside as a pass rusher. Lacks discipline on RPO’s. Guesses wrong and loses contain on such plays (vs. Northwestern 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 1:05 mark).

He’s an elite level athlete for a player his size. There aren’t many players who come along and can do the variety of things that he can do athletically. He’s an athletic marvel to the point that he can run with receivers downfield. He can drop back and cover without issue. His hips are fluid and the amount of ground he covers is absurd. His skill set is off the charts but still his game leaves a lot to be desired. His game seems bland and he isn’t as impactful as he could and should be. He’s a gifted pass rusher naturally but it doesn’t surface much. He seems content with engaging the OL/TE on almost every play. He plays too safe. He really needs to unleash what he has naturally which is a lot as a pass rusher. He’s a presence but he often doesn’t net any results. His versatility is a big plus being able to play anywhere along the DL and also his capabilities in coverage but his game falls short in him making plays. He should dazzle in a Combine and/or Pro Day type setting. His standing as far as where to play him would be a team by team decision due to the fact hat he is versatile but his best position may very well be as an OLB who covers TE’s, slot receivers and RB’s. He’s a stellar athlete who may not have a defined next level position. His lack of production is telling and very revealing when given an extended glance. Late 5th-7th round.

#6 Tony Jones Jr. (rJr.) RB 5-11 224. Has appeared in 25 games with 3 starts. Has good size for the position. Has a solid build. A decent athlete. Has good fundamentals as a ball carrier. Protects the ball thru the hole. Carries the ball with both arms. Runs with a low pad level. Has a forward lean as a runner. Has good balance thru contact (vs. Ball State 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:23 mark). Quick and nimble. Keeps his legs churning thru contact (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:43 mark and vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:12 mark). Has some short area wiggle thru the hole. Has soft hands as a pass catcher (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 13:37 mark). A solid pass protector. Identifies the blitz well. Gives good effort as a blocker.

Doesn’t have much career production (127 carries, 624 yards and 6 TD’s with 12 catches, 169 yards and 1 TD). Isn’t an explosive athlete. Doesn’t have breakaway ability as a runner. Has average speed (appears to run in the 4.60-4.70 40 range). Looks sluggish in the open field (vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 10:34 mark). Isn’t a refined route runner. Only really runs swing routes and wheel routes. Doesn’t sell his routes. Doesn’t always display good blocking technique.

He’s dependable and reliable back. He’s an in between the tackles type back. He’s a downhill runner who gets straight to the point. He rarely ever waists time running east west. As dependable as he is he hasn’t proven himself to be a bell cow back. His carries have been low for two years which is understandable with him not being the featured back. He’s solid but he doesn’t possess any one special trait as a next level prospect. He lacks speed and isn’t as agile as you’d want to compensate for his lack of speed and explosiveness. He’s good at everything he does as a RB but with the lack of a true speed component he’d be best served exhausting his eligibility. He wouldn’t be a top level prospect no matter the season he has. He needs to stay and play really well for the next two seasons in order to make himself into a viable next level prospect. Doesn’t declare.

#83 Chase Claypool (Sr.) WR 6-4 3/8 229. Has appeared in 37 games with 20 starts. Has excellent size for the position. Has a muscular frame with great weight distribution. Has broad shoulders with long arms. Has a really big catch radius. Versatile. A ST performer. Covers on both kickoff and as a gunner on punt coverage. Has experience at the W, X and Y positions. Good athlete. Has good agility and flexibility. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.50-4.60 40 range). Has good short area quickness. Elusive off of the line against press coverage. Has a really quick stutter step to avoid the jam off of the line (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:00 mark).

Suffered an AC joint injury to his right shoulder in December of 2017. Had surgery on December 19, 2017 and missed the Citrus Bowl against LSU on January 1, 2018 as a result. Had surgery after suffering a high ankle sprain on his right foot in April of 2019 during the Spring Game. Isn’t a refined route runner. Doesn’t have good footwork into and out of his breaks. Runs deliberate routes. Runs a slow quick out route (vs. Pitt 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 12 at the 1:02 mark). Isn’t a technically sound blocker. Doesn’t put great effort into being a blocker (vs. Northwestern 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 13:55 mark). Doesn’t latch on at a high rate in space.

He’s a really good athlete with size and strength. He’s most effective on slant routes and downfield routes where he can get straight to the point. He’s good in those areas but he has also been plagued by inconsistencies his entire career as a receiver. When he has to cut, break down or change direction as a route runner he isn’t explosive. This limits his capability in what he can really do and his involvement in an offense. He doesn’t do a good job of selling his routes or try to convince a defender to respect his route running ability. He doesn’t seem to ever really get any separation as a route runner or as a downfield receiving threat. He runs his routes slower in off coverage than he does in press. He needs the adversity of a CB in his face to really be effective. He needs to run full boar at all times in order to stretch a defense. He also hasn’t been a red zone threat in his career. His is a matchup that hasn’t been one where he can obviously be used to exploit a defensive back. He may run fast once he gets a full head of steam, have tantalizing size and jump well at the Combine and/or his Pro Day workout but his game day play will ultimately decide his fate and he doesn’t play up to what his testing number will say he seems to be. 5th-7th round.

#53 Khalid Kareem (Sr.) DE 6-4 265. Has appeared in 30 games with 13 starts. Named a team captain in August of 2019. Has really good size for the position. Has god weight distribution all throughout his frame. Has broad shoulders with long arms. Versatile. Has lined up at every position along the defensive line. Good athlete. Has good quickness off of the snap (vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:01 mark and vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:57 mark). Generally the first defender to move upfield at the snap. Has good strength at the point of attack as a pass rusher. Has strong hands. Knocks OT’s back on initial contact. Keeps OL away from his frame. Gets good push on OT’s with a strong stiff arm (vs. Stanford 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 13:26 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 3 at the :23 mark). Stout as a run defender. He can take on blocks without giving up ground. Can disengage quickly. Will take on a block and disengage in time enough to make a play on the ball (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the :32 mark). Quick when penetrating the line as a run defender (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 14 at the 12:34 mark). Plays assignment sound as both a pass and run defender. Has really good awareness (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 15:00 mark and vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:03 mark).

Suffered an injured left ankle against Michigan on September 1, 2018. Suffered a high ankle sprain to his right foot against Vanderbilt on September 15, 2018. Isn’t a top flight athlete. Doesn’t have great fluidity or agility. Doesn’t have great straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.75-4.80 40 range). Isn’t particularly fast or explosive as a pass rusher. Lacks the agility and flexibility to bend around an OT’s outside shoulder. Isn’t a varied pass rusher. Doesn’t have any pass rush moves. Will rise up out of his stance at the snap at times. Uses his hands but they aren’t really fast or active. Gets pushed back off of the line as a result (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & Goal at the 12:48 mark). Has a tough time against the cut block. Gets chopped down like a tree at times (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the :14 mark). Doesn’t have much experience dropping back into coverage.

He’s a good athlete with top level type strength. He has a blend of strength and quickness that serves him really well as a run defender and also as a pass rusher (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 1:21 mark). He can overwhelm OT’s because they first have to deal with the quickness off of the snap and then the strength and power. He’s extremely stout and has the size and size potential to play inside at DT both as a pass rusher and run defender as well as his natural position at SDE. He does the little things well and is a well rounded defender but he lacks the athleticism of a top flight pass rushing DE. He lacks the flexibility and overall consistent burst off of the snap to be a real viable threat as a next level pass rusher. His quickness doesn’t equate to getting by an OL even though he is a lot of times the first defender to move. He never seems to be able to speed by OL. He has to engage as a pass rusher and disengage but that takes too much time when offenses run a lot of short routes. He’s a defender who could potentially be a 8-10 sacks a season guy but never the elite member on his team. His Combine and Pro Day workout will go a long way in determining where he gets drafted. He should do well in the 10 yard split but not in the drills where he has to change direction and show bend. He’s a winner but he’s not a premier pass rusher so he may go lower than he should even though he’s a more complete DE than most who will be drafted ahead of him. An unsung type and one who will make a team very happy that he fell to them. Mid 2nd-early 3rd round.

#78 Tommy Kraemer (rJr.) RG/RT 6-5 5/8 319. Has appeared in 25 games with 22 starts (12 at RT and 10 at RG). Has great size for the position. Has great height and weight distribution all throughout his frame. Has broad shoulders with good arm length. Versatile. Has starting experience at both RG and RT. Decent athlete. Has excellent strength. Has very strong hands. Hands are like steel traps. Once a defender is in his clutches they don’t get out. Can latch onto a defender and control their movements (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 1 at the 12:26 mark). A man mover and a mauler as a run blocker. An excellent down blocker. Collapses the right side of the defensive line at times (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:05 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 4 at the 1:41 mark). Has good forward quickness off of the snap and to the second level. Latches on at a good rate at the second level on pulls. Doesn’t lunge at LB’s on the second level (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:27 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 11:15 mark, vs. Florida State 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:38 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:06 mark). Anchors really quickly as a pass blocker. Doesn’t get pushed back into the pocket often. Absorbs the rusher/blitzer without giving up ground. Plays with good technique. A natural knee bender. Come out of his stance low with a solid base (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 2:21 mark vs. Pitt 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:11 mark and vs. Pitt 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:27 mark).

Missed the game against Wake Forest on September 22, 2018 with an ankle sprain suffered during practice. Isn’t a really good athlete. On the slow side. Doesn’t have good foot speed (appears to run in the 5.30-5.40 40 range). Lacks lateral agility and mobility. Isn’t a RT. Feet are plodding in his kick slide at RT (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 10:32 mark). Has difficulty redirect his weight from one direction to the other (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 7:59 mark and vs. Stanford 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 14:31 mark).

He’s an extremely strong individual. He creates running lanes. He’s a smash mouth mauler who can move just about any man while barely ever being moved himself. His technique is sound. He stays low for the most part out of his stance has an extremely strong base and has good foot width. His hands are neutralizers and he gets good arm extension consistently. This is the player defenders contend with play in and out but his lack of lateral agility is a major issue. There are times when he’s using good technique but can’t sustain a block beyond initial contact because his feet simply can’t keep up with a defender with speed (vs. Pitt 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:51 mark). It becomes a matter of balance and he will lose his and appear to have a rag doll effect while holding on to his blocks. He showed improvements after being taken out of the lineup for two games and really capped off the season with a stellar performance against former Clemson Tiger and the 13th overall pick in the 1st round by the Miami Dolphins in Christian Wilkins. He played Christian better than any OL did in 2018-2019. That’s an encouraging sign and shows the potential of what he can do with improved footwork. All indications are that he worked really hard on his body composition and foot speed and that he’s a better looking and quicker player but that remains to be seen. If he has improved there’d be no reason for him to exhaust his eligibility because he would be one of the premier OG’s as a next level prospect. He won’t improve his lateral agility to the point where it isn’t something noticeable so he’s a G only prospect. He will struggle some with it at the Combine but have a great workout with his strength numbers. He can improve on his Combine numbers with more time to work at his Pro Day workout. Late 2nd-late 3rd round.

#91 Adetokunbo Ogundeji (rJr.) DE 6-4 3/8 253. Has appeared in 18 games with 0 starts. Has excellent size for the position. Has broad shoulders with long arms and good weight distribution all throughout his frame. Good athlete. Has good movement skills. Isn’t stiff in any of his movements. Very active. Has a high motor. Makes the most of every snap. Will chase a play down from the backside (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 13 at the 11:51 mark). Stout as a run defender. Doesn’t get pushed back off of the line much. Will stack and shed and keep OL off of his frame to make a play on the ball (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:13 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:52 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 13:20 mark).

Doesn’t have much career production (24 tackles, 3 tackles for loss and 1.5 sacks). Played a total of 238 snaps in 2018. Lacks a powerful lower body with thin thighs and calves. Isn’t a refined pass rusher. Lacks pass rush moves. Doesn’t display great speed off of the snap. Lacks flexibility around the OT’s outside shoulder (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 14 at the 8:23 mark and vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 4th quarter, 4th & 3 at the 6:44 mark). Doesn’t consistently disengage from blocks quickly enough to make a play on the ball (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 13:48 mark).

He’s a good mover for such a big athlete. His movement skill set lends itself to him maybe being more than just a DE. He appears to have the capability to move well in space. He looks like he can play some OLB and drop into coverage as well as rush the passer at OLB. As a DE he is sturdy as a run defender. As a pass rusher he has upside because he’s a hard worker with a high motor but he’s still raw. He at times does a stutter step at the snap instead of getting upfield. This takes away from his upfield burst and allows the OT time to ready themselves for whatever he’s bringing. He also lacks the flexibility to get around them. Most of his encounters with OL are head on where he has to attempt to shed them where it once again slows his upfield surge. He’s a player who has been and will continue to be a backup so his snaps won’t increase greatly from what he received in 2018 but if he continues to improve his game he should be in line to start after next season and begin to build his profile as a next level prospect. Doesn’t declare.

#42 Julian Okwara (Sr.) OLB/DE 6-4 1/2 248. Has appeared in 36 games with 12 starts. Has athletic bloodlines. Younger brother of former Notre Dame student/athlete Romeo Okwara (2012-2015). He is currently a starting DE for the Detroit Lions. Named a team captain in August of 2019. Versatile. Has experience at OLB in a 3-4 as well as at DE in a 4-3 and inside as a pass rusher at DT. Can drop back into coverage as well. Has a pass rushers build. Has a sleek frame with good muscle definition. Excellent athlete! A quick twitch athlete. Has very good agility, fluidity and mobility. Has really quick hips. Extremely quick and fast off of the snap. Has a great burst out of his stance. He’s on the OT’s outside shoulder in a hurry (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 6:09 mark). Gets them really uncomfortable quickly. Has good bend around the OT (vs. Pitt 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 5 at the 3:43 mark). Has good pass rush moves. Has a speed rush, a good bull rush and a nice spin move (vs. Pitt 2018, 4th quarter, 4th & 29 at the 1:46 mark). Has really good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.50-4.55 40 range). A lot stronger than he appears. Can convert speed to power. Can get good push on OT’s and jolt them backwards (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 11:40 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 6 at the 1:13 mark). Has a strong hand punch. Has a relentlessness the closer he gets to the QB (vs. Northwestern 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 12:02 mark). Covers a lot of ground when dropping back into coverage. Can run stride for stride with any TE and most receivers downfield. Will undercut routes when dropping back (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 1 at the 1:28 mark). Good open field tackler (vs. Pitt 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:34 mark and vs. Pitt 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 3 at the 8:16 mark). Can quickly stack and shed at the LOS to make a play on the ball (vs. Pitt 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 11:41 mark and vs. Pitt 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:40 mark). Has good RPO recognition (vs. Pitt 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:42 mark).

Isn’t extremely flexible around the edge as a pass rusher. Doesn’t have great bend. Has a bit off stiffness in his hips when trying to get around an OT. Doesn’t use his counter pass rush moves often. Uses mainly a speed rush and a bull rush. Rarely uses his spin move. Will get buried at times once the OT catches his outside rush (vs. Pitt 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 9 at the 14:16 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 6:16 mark). Gets stuck to blocks a lot. Doesn’t consistently use his hands to fight off blocks. Will get overpowered by OT’s and TE’s at times. Isn’t a natural in coverage. Will hesitate and get caught peeking at the QB and lose the TE off of the line (vs. Michigan 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:53 mark).

He’s an extremely gifted athlete and pass rusher. Even though he can get to the QB consistently he still hasn’t fully tapped into what he can be. He’s a bit of a terror. He does affect plays even if he doesn’t convert his pressures into sacks. He unofficially had upwards of 50 QB hurries in 2018!!! With further refinement he can put up some more sacks instead of always being close by. He also could improve his get off of the snap as well. He’s explosive but he’s rarely the first defender to move off of the snap. He needs to be better at his first step because ever step after is at a blazing clip. His flexibility has to improve also in order for him to fulfill his immense potential. He at times appears more straight lineish than he does flexible. If he can hone that skill of bending around the outside shoulder he would be unblockable. He has added about 8 pounds of noticeably mass and also appears stronger than he did in 2018. Its size and strength that was needed. He will perform extremely well at the Combine in most speed and agility drills but he may have a bit of an issue with the 3 cone drill. If he can perform well in this drill and not show much stiffness he may propel himself into a very high pick. Has the upside to be a premier pass rusher for years to come. Mid 1st-mid 2nd round.

#5 Troy Pride Jr. (Sr.) CB 5-11.5 194. Has appeared in 32 games with 19 starts. Excellent athlete!!! A quick twitch athlete. Very smooth, fluid, flexible, agile and mobile in all of his movements. Has great straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.32-4.40 40 range). Light on his feet. Very smooth in his backpedal. Very balanced and succinct. Springs out of his backpedal forward to make a play on the ball (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 2 at the 10:44 mark). Triangulates in off coverage very well. Keeps his eyes on both the WR and QB. Makes the sight and physical adjustment to a pump fake or variation of a route (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:15 mark). Is always stride for stride downfield with the receiver in press coverage (vs. Vanderbilt 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 9:01 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the :28 mark, vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 9 at the 12:16 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 13:12 mark).

Suffered a mild ankle sprain against Virginia Tech on October 6, 2018. Missed the next weeks game against Pitt on October 13, 2018 as a result. Isn’t a very physical or strong defender. Isn’t a strong finisher as a tackler (vs. USC 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:57 mark). Will miss some easy tackles at times (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 3rd & 4 at the :50 mark and vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:53 mark). Doesn’t disengage from blocks quickly (vs. USC 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:45 mark).

He’s an exceptional athlete. There’s nothing that he can’t do physically. His athletic talents are top flight. He uses his quickness, speed and fluidity to stick to receivers like glue. His movement skills are beyond his years in his technique. He works really hard at the craft of playing CB with proper technique. Although both quick and fast he’s very economical in all of his movements. He doesn’t waste motion. He doesn’t flinch. As a press cover CB he rarely gives up an inch. QB’s don’t look in his direction off of the snap if he’s in the receivers face at the line. If he gives up a reception there aren’t any yards to be had after the catch. As a CB in off coverage he needs to improve. He plays a lot in off coverage and gives up a lot of easy catches. It’s the design of the defense but he never seems to instinctively pounce on the underneath routes and either defend a pass or pick them off. He needs to show himself to be a bit more instinctive off of the ball. He faced some first class WR’s in 2018 and only gave up 1 TD. It was a late 4th quarter pass to USC’s Tyler Vaughns. He was playing outside leverage and gave up the inside route so although the play was tailored for the receiver to make the play he still heavily contested the pass. He’s s special player with great upside. If he has as good a season as he has in 2018 and has the great a postseason that he’s capable of at the Combine he’s a definite climber and may ascend to the 1st round. Late 1st-early 3rd round.

#8 Donte Vaughn (Sr.) CB 6-2 3/4 212. Has appeared in 30 games with 5 starts. Versatile. Has experience at both the field and boundary CB positions. Has great size for the position. Has good weight distribution all throughout his frame. Has extremely long arms. Has the wingspan of a condor. Good athlete. Has good technique. Stays low and balanced in his backpedal. Has quick feet in and out of his backpedal.

Was hampered by a back injury with nerve issues that sent shooting pains down his leg in the spring of 2017. Suffered a neck injury in August of 2017 during fall practice. Played the 2018 with a torn right labrum (shoulder). Had surgery on the shoulder in January of 2019. Doesn’t have much career production (41 tackles and 1 INT). Isn’t consistent in his technique. Doesn’t always stay low in his backpedal. Will stumble or lose balance when shifting his weight out of his backpedal at times. Isn’t always an agile and fluid mover. Has issue changing direction quickly (vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:32 mark). Doesn’t recognize the RPO well. Will get fooled and overcommit (vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:26 mark).

He’s a good athlete. He has incredible size for a CB prospect. The combination makes him an intriguing next level prospect but his career has been derailed by some unfortunate and untimely injuries. He’s to be commended for playing thru injury but his game did suffer due to the fact he appeared at times to be playing with one arm which made him a bit of a liability. His strength and tackling suffered some but the shoulder didn’t affect his ability to stay with receivers. There’s no way of knowing how badly the shoulder injury affected the outcome of the results of some of his well documented plays but the fact was he was in good position on all of them. A healthy shoulder more than likely changes the prospective. Having done everything right from being in good position and getting his head around while still being on the receiver tightly it still results in a TD (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 8 at the 5:45 mark). The receiver did pull down on his right shoulder but that’s a football play. Against Clemson it was again an issue with the right arm and shoulder with him losing balance right before he got his head around to look for the ball (vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:00 mark). Was again in position, ran with the receiver downfield, turned his head and even got his hand on the pass by with the same result (vs. Clemson 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the :09 mark). He’s more than likely a starter if he can maintain his health while also holding off a talented sophomore. With a healthy season he could regain the traction he once had in 2016. He’s certainly talented enough to become a viable next level prospect but he has to prove he’s more than just an athletic big man. Improving his ball skills with the ball in the air would go a long way towards his next level efforts. He has to have a good Combine if he’s invited but more than likely Pro Day. 6th-UDFA.

#69 Aaron Banks (rSo.) LG 6-6 325. Has appeared in 13 games with 6 starts. Versatile. Has cross trained at both LT and RT before his move to LG. Has some in game experience at LT. A massive human being! Has wide shoulders with very long arms. Has excellent mass and weight distribution all throughout his frame. Good athlete. Always seems composed and coordinated in all of his movements. Has really good quickness. He’s quick off of the snap and into his stance. Displays really quick hands and feet. Really light on his feet. Has good technique. Keeps a wide base from the waist down for good balance. Anchors and reanchors fast. Doesn’t get pushed back off of the line. Has good hand placement. Gets his hands into the defenders chest and stops their momentum in pass protection (vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:11 mark, vs. Syracuse 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:20 mark, vs. Syracuse 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 14:52 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 2 at the 10:40 mark). Extremely strong and powerful. A man mover and mauler. Jolts the defender backwards with his hand punch as both a run blocker and pass protector. Gets great push as a short yardage run blocker. Very alert and aware in pass protection. Will quickly come off of his initial block and pick up the blitz (vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 12:01 mark and vs. Syracuse 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 10:09 mark). Really effective as a pulling G. Connects at a high rate when reaching the second level when pulling. Moves really well in space (vs. USC 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 8 at the 11:10 mark, vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 15 at the 14:24 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 7:36 mark).

Underwent surgery on a broken foot in June of 2019. Was fully recovered for fall camp in August. Will get caught with his hands too low at times which will allow a defender to rip him and get him off balanced (vs. Northwestern 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 13 at the 9:11 mark). Is at times susceptible to the swim move (vs. Syracuse 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & Goal at the 1:20 mark and vs. Syracuse 2018, 3rd quarter, 3rd & 7 at the 5:48 mark).

He’s a tremendous athlete for a player his size. He’s quick and agile and although hasn’t played much at OT there isn’t a question of whether or not he could play there effectively. He’s versatile and well rounded which is a big plus for his future. He’s also a powerhouse. He is more than likely the strong, most physically imposing player that defenders who have played against him has ever faced. He’s extremely strong in his hands and arms in his upper body as well as his legs and feet in his lower body. He’s strong from head to toe. His power is one of which discourages defenders. Not many have made former Clemson Tiger and number four overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft by the Oakland Raiders DE Clelin Ferrell appear powerless and childlike (vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 4 at the 5:15 mark). He shows textbook level technique on a consistent basis as a pass protector (vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 4:22 mark). As a run blocker he can pancake defenders, knock them back off of the ball, execute a solid block with good body position and get to the second level quickly and effectively. He’s the total package. The only question is does he refine his technique well enough to make a next level jump so soon. Ideally he would need to play another two years to fine tune and hone his skills to the point where he’s completely ready but from a strength standpoint he appears almost there if not all the way there. He’s a punishing blocker who knows exactly what he’s doing. His game is mature beyond his years and if he continues to play in 2019 the way he did in 2018 or slightly better he’s without question a viable next level prospect. He should test very well at the Combine in the agility drills and even though he has long arms, in the strength department. He can play LT and RT but he is extremely good at OG and can be a perennial Pro Bowl or All Pro level player there. Early 1st-early 2nd round.

#72 Robert Hainsey (Jr.) RT 6-4 5/8 298. Has appeared in 26 games with 14 starts. Named a team captain in August of 2019. Good athlete. Composed and coordinated in all of his movements. Has really good technique. Has good footwork as a RT. Sets up well with his first step in his kick slide (vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 12 at the 10:36 mark). Can steer a speed rusher past the QB with his own foot speed (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 6 at the 7:39 mark and vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 14 at the 1:20 mark). Strong and sturdy. Reanchors well. Can take the initial shock of a pass rushers speed to power and/or bull rush and quickly reestablish his position (vs. Clemson 2018, 1st quarter, 3rd & 10 at the 13:11 mark). Has good hand placement. Has strong hands. Can maul a defender at times (vs. Michigan 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 13:40 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 7:53 mark). Gets around quickly on pulls (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 11 at the 8:23 mark and vs. Florida State 2018, 4th quarter, 2nd & 9 at the 14:33 mark). Quick with a cut block (vs. Northwestern 2018, 4th quarter, 3rd & 4 at the 13:55 mark).

Doesn’t have great size for the position. Lacks mass and strength. Isn’t a great athlete. Lacks flexibility and lateral agility. A bit plodding with his feet against speed (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 8:12 mark). Will whiff and lunge at defenders who line up in the wide 9 (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:58 mark and vs. Clemson 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 10 at the 10:14 mark). Will get his hands too low on a defender at times and get ripped and thrown off balance (vs. Michigan 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & Goal at the 5:12 mark). Can get overpowered in such instances as well (vs. Michigan 2018, 3rd quarter, 2nd & 7 at the 13:21 mark).

He’s a good athlete who has improved in both the strength and technique department a great deal from his freshman to sophomore year. It’s noticeable how with his hands he’s able to control defenders much more and much better. He generally keeps his QB clean and the defender very quiet with his solid technique. He doesn’t seem to get beaten in the more conventional way but by lining up really wide where his lack of flexibility comes into play. He isn’t a player who’s fluid in his movements so his lateral moves are a bit labored as are his movements in space. This is why his best position as a next level prospect may very well be at OG. He’s strong and quick enough to withstand the immediacy of the position. He can easily adjust to defenders being on him in a hurry and also be able to anchor and withstand their strength. He’s equipped enough though to remain at RT though although he is on the smaller side for the position. Either way he does need to add a bit more mass to his frame and add more strength. He may have some appeal as a player who could declare early but it’s in his best interest to maximize his stock by exhausting his eligibility and making himself as ready as possible. Two more years of solid growth and experience should get him to the point of being a very good next level prospect and even a highly sought one. Doesn’t declare.

#84 Cole Kmet (Jr.) TE 6-6 250. Has appeared in 24 games with 7 starts. Has great size for the position. Looks the part. Has prototypical height and weight with broad shoulders and long arms. Has the frame to add more mass without sacrificing any athleticism. Versatile. Has experience lined up in the backfield (H-Back), inline and in the slot. Good athlete. Has good straight line speed (appears to run in the 4.70-4.75 40 range). Quick out of his three point stance as a route runner. Sells playing the decoy really well (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 4th & 2 at the 1:51 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 3:50 mark). A natural hands catcher. Has good hands. Has good balance thru contact after the catch. Has good blocking technique (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 1st & 10 at the 9:13 mark, vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 6 at the 13:28 mark and vs. Northwestern 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 7:04 mark). Gives good effort as a blocker. Really strong and sturdy on initial contact as a blocker (vs. Stanford 2018, 1st quarter, 2nd & 11 at the 8:22 mark). Can drive thru and bury a defender (vs. Virginia Tech 2018, 4th quarter, 1st & 10 at the 5:38 mark). Latches on at a high rate in space.

Missed the Vanderbilt and Wake Forest games respectively on September 15, 2018 and September 22, 2018 after suffering a severe high ankle sprain to his right foot against Ball State on September 8, 2018. Suffered a broken right clavicle (collarbone) on August 8, 2019. Underwent surgery the following day with an expected recovery time of between 4 to 10 weeks. Doesn’t have much career production statically (17 catches, 176 yards and 0 TD’s). Isn’t a top flight athlete. Doesn’t possess a great deal of agility, fluidity or flexibility. Isn’t a sharp route runner. Isn’t very sudden. Doesn’t gain much separation into and out of his breaks as a route runner. Isn’t elusive or evasive in the open field as a pass catcher (vs. Navy 2018, 2nd quarter, 2nd & 5 at the 7:40 mark). Doesn’t gain many yards after the catch.

He’s the total package at the TE position. He can pass catch but more than that he’s already and accomplished blocker. He’s a budding star as a blocking TE. He gives excellent effort and doesn’t concede anything as a blocker to anyone including bigger players at DE, LB’s, and smaller and shifter players at DB. Despite his many gifts for the position he may still have his limitations. He isn’t the best of athletes. Although he does have good enough speed for the position he does lack lower body flexibility and doesn’t appear very agile or fluid. Defenders can always go low to ensure a sure tackle. He can’t seem to get out of the way of a defender who goes for his legs for a tackle (vs. Navy 2018, 2nd quarter, 1st & 10 at the 2:58 mark). As a route runner he didn’t appear open a lot out of his breaks. He has to work on his short area explosiveness as a route runner to better avail himself to his QB immediately. If he can somehow improve on his athleticism he could surely be a top tier next level prospect with the upside to go as high as the first round but realistically he’s not as athletic as teams would want to warrant such a high pick. He should test well enough at the Combine and/or Pro Day workout to not hurt his stock but a lot depends on the health of his shoulder and how soon as a fast healer he can come back and contribute to the team as well as remain healthy for the season. He’s a very good player who’s ceiling may be as a really good player but never reach the heights of greatness because of his lack of great athleticism. 2nd-Late 3rd round if he declares.

Non draft eligible player(s) of note:

There were no major true freshmen contributors of note.


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